Wicked Good Guides / Boston Cityviews /

Hyde Park Avenue, part 1

Think of "Boston" these days and you think of the Red Sox or chowder or colleges or mutual funds or something. "Heavy industry" doesn't tend to spring to mind. But Boston was once a thriving industrial center, with much of its activity along Hyde Park Avenue in Hyde Park and Readville. Today, a drive down Hyde Park Avenue offers an interesting look at this history, from the Factory Street that now leads only to a Brooks pharmacy to weird industrial artifacts to factories that are still very much in business. Let's take a quick tour:

In case you need to pound sand:

Hyde Park is becoming something of an artists' colony. Is this an ironic comment on the post-industrial nature of the neighborhood, or just a bunch of giant gears somebody dumped by the train tracks?

Hyde Park used to be all business:

If you ever need to rent a cherry picker, Hyde Park Avenue is the place to go:

Where cement mixers go to die:

Electric vines:

A palette of pallets:

McCoy Fence takes no chances. In addition to a wall and a chain-link fence topped with barbed wire, its yard is guarded by several quiet, jumping German shepherds:

Hmm, how come Boston Woodworks is in a metal building?

One never gets tired of Hyde Park Avenue:

The geometry of Readville Station on the Franklin line:

The modern pedestrian spans are right in front of an old truss bridge:

And so we come to the end of our tour. Hyde Park Avenue ends at this gate (which leads to another factory):

Comments

Good shots that take me back. I grew up in the area. As kids we used to walk the train tracks with a look over our shoulders for oncoming trains.

jjdaley on March 9, 2004 08:59 PM.


If you had bothered to look more closely you would have seen gorgeous Victorian homes in Hyde Park on the Ave where I happen to live in one as well as some newer construction. Many of the old homes are being renovated and painted like they may have been, mine is the only pink house on Hyde Park Ave.

Eileen Velez on March 24, 2004 10:23 PM.


I live on Hyde Park Ave and you had bothered to go a little more in depth you'd have seen some lovely old Victorian homes many of which are being renovated and updated. Mine is the only pink house on the Ave.

Eileen Velez on March 24, 2004 10:25 PM.


I GREW UP IN HYDE PARK LIVED THERE FOR 30YEARS. HERE ARE SOME QUICK HISTORICAL FACTS.ONE OF THE FIRST AUTOMOBILES WAS BUILT ON BUISNESS ST.IN A FACTORY THAT STILL STANDS. JONH J ENAKING THE FAMOUSE LANDSCAPE ARTIST LIVED NEAR THE ROGERS MIDDLE SCHOOL.HIS HOUSE STILL STAND WITH AN HISTORICAL MARKER ON IT.AT THE END OF HYDE PARK AVE IS THE READVILLE SECTION THERE IS A PARK THERE (MEIGS FEILD) IT WAS WERE CIVIL WAR SOLDIERS TRAINED FOR THE WAR AND WERE THE 54TH MASS REGIMENT TRAINED( DEPICTED IN THE MOVIE GLORY) FREQUENT GUEST TO THE CAMP WERE THE ABOLITIONIST FREDRICK DOUGLAS AND WILLIAM LOYDE GARRISON. KEEP UP THE GOOD WORK THANKS FOR THE SITE.

MICHAEL M on April 6, 2004 11:10 AM.


It was great to see this beautiful city.
I also wrote a song about it.
It si called "I love Boston"

Yours Hansi Hinterseher

hansi Hintetseher on April 13, 2004 11:38 AM.


took me back to my childhood, born and raised in hyde park {corner of beacon st. and met. ave} went to the weld school and m.p.b.

mark ross on April 20, 2004 03:01 PM.


I am eagerly awaiting your Part 2 of Hyde Park Ave.

Eileen Velez on May 27, 2004 11:56 PM.


You should take a look at it, eventually itll be gone, replaces by expensive real estate, homes, commercial, business. Thats what always happens.

Mr. Jupiter on May 29, 2004 09:02 AM.


What's your point about Boston Woodworks? Why not in a metal building?

t.rhode on July 6, 2004 12:26 PM.


Hyde Park, Oh what a town! I grew up here when I was young and everything but the name has changed. We used to listen to the local concerts and hang around and shop in a once thriving downtown. The Streets were safe then and you could walk to just about anything you needed, including a job. The glory is gone and so are the happy neighbors, families, friends and visitors that used to walk those once safe community streets. Today despite what some people say, Hyde Park is crawling with racial tention, violence and drugs. I still bring my family down Child Street, Gordan ave. and off River St. to show them the remnance of a city I love and streets that I remember. Sadly an area now considered the "Ghetto" to the eyes of young suburban boys. I wish Hyde Park the best and admonish the efforts of those who try there best to clean Hyde Park up and build new homes. Only time will tell the true fate amd I hope that someday this neiborhood will flourish once agian.

Mr. Sprague on July 15, 2004 07:55 PM.


I compiled and had published the book "The First Hundred years" entered into the library of Congress -- The History of Hyde Park. Anyone have a copy they can send me. Someone borrowed my last copy and bever gave it back. Written in 1968. I lived off Hyde Park Avenue on Easton Avenue. Born in Hyde Park and now I am a true Texan. Go Red SOx!

Bob Fuoco on July 23, 2004 04:48 PM.


OH My Goodness how I remember Hyde Park as it once was. It was an awesome place to live and grow up. You could go anywhere at anytime. Hang out at the square and meet friends. Shopping downtown Hyde Park was a treat. I remember when Lodgen's Market was there, the awesome fruit stand, Ann's Apparel, Robert's Jewelry, Sylvia's gift store, Singer's clothing where my aunt Mary Fuoco worked.. and of course Hyde Park Cleansers where I worked for so so long.. Peter and Charlie the proprieters were the greatest bosses and best dry cleansers for miles around.
Ah yes those were the days.. Ross field, the Y,M.C.A. Hyde Park High, Barton Rogers,Fairmount Hill where all those glorious houses were, Daylights, Emmanuel's, the cute little coffee shop( Dottie's) next to Piece O'Pizza (as it was known in those days..)Piece O' Pizza used to be a furniture place. Dottie's once was a little deli that my beloved father-in-law "Moe"Fuoco owned.
My Uncle Bobby's campaign headquarters in Cleary Square.. where all our friend's used to meet.
Uncle Bob Fuoco's Driving School.
God, how great it was!! Everyone knew everyone. I miss those days and those wonderful times and the way in which our beloved Hyde Park used to be.Hot summer days when we walked everywhere we went and felt no fear.
But, now it is a melting pot for many diversified races and cultures and thats not a bad thing as some might think. Quit the contrary its a place for people to learn to live together,and be friends and neighbors once again.. but most of all a place for all to work to bring it back to the wonderful little suburb of Boston it once was.
Yes, it does need a major face lift and rejuvenation. How sad and ironic, the Mayor of the City of Boston lives in this very town, yet somehow sees no need to beautify the place that most represents him. It should be his shining example to all the other suburbs in the greater Boston area .. yet he feel no need, and sadly neglects our once beloved Hyde Park.
I will always always remember the way it once was, determined to never forget. How proud I am still, to say I was born and brought up there..Because, we like so many others knew it when it was at its best.

Karen Fuoco on July 24, 2004 10:18 AM.


OH My Goodness how I remember Hyde Park as it once was. It was an awesome place to live and grow up. You could go anywhere at anytime. Hang out at the square and meet friends. Shopping downtown Hyde Park was a treat. I remember when Lodgen's Market was there, the awesome fruit stand, Ann's Apparel, Robert's Jewelry, Sylvia's gift store, Singer's clothing where my aunt Mary Fuoco worked.. and of course Hyde Park Cleansers where I worked for so so long.. Peter and Charlie the proprieters were the greatest bosses and best dry cleansers for miles around.
Ah yes those were the days.. Ross field, the Y,M.C.A. Hyde Park High, Barton Rogers,Fairmount Hill where all those glorious houses were, Daylights, Emmanuel's, the cute little coffee shop( Dottie's) next to Piece O'Pizza (as it was known in those days..)Piece O' Pizza used to be a furniture place. Dottie's once was a little deli that my beloved father-in-law "Moe"Fuoco owned.
My Uncle Bobby's campaign headquarters in Cleary Square.. where all our friend's used to meet.
Uncle Bob Fuoco's Driving School.
God, how great it was!! Everyone knew everyone. I miss those days and those wonderful times and the way in which our beloved Hyde Park used to be.Hot summer days when we walked everywhere we went and felt no fear.
But, now it is a melting pot for many diversified races and cultures and thats not a bad thing as some might think. Quit the contrary its a place for people to learn to live together,and be friends and neighbors once again.. but most of all a place for all to work to bring it back to the wonderful little suburb of Boston it once was.
Yes, it does need a major face lift and rejuvenation. How sad and ironic, the Mayor of the City of Boston lives in this very town, yet somehow sees no need to beautify the place that most represents him. It should be his shining example to all the other suburbs in the greater Boston area .. yet he feel no need, and sadly neglects our once beloved Hyde Park.
I will always always remember the way it once was, determined to never forget. How proud I am still, to say I was born and brought up there..Because, we like so many others knew it when it was at its best.

Posted by Karen Fuoco at July 24, 2004 10:18 AM

Karen Fuoco on July 24, 2004 08:06 PM.


Busing destroyed a wonderful community, not because it forced us to go to school with different ethnic groups but because it forced us out of our own schools ...

Paul Feeley on August 28, 2004 11:00 AM.


Loved all the comments about HP. It was a great place to be a teenager in the 70s. River St, Cleary Sq, HP Ave, Ross field. Cruising in the Plymouth and listening to AM radio. Paul Feeley was right, Forced busing ruined HP and all of Boston as well. A better idea, would have been to let folks make up their own minds and apply to the school THEY want to attend. That mess ruined the senior yr for class of 75. And put a stain on HP that lingered toooo long.

Patty Mank Novia on October 21, 2004 06:30 PM.


I often hear about stories of Hyde Park from my mom and aunt who grew up in Hyde Park in the 50's and 60's. They are so fond of Cleary Square "back then". I was wondering if anyone has any photos of Cleary Square during that era, especially any photos of Daylights. Daylight is a place that my mom often talks about and I would love to have a photo framed to remind her. . . thank you

Jennifer on March 13, 2005 09:46 AM.


Nice H. P. site...Grew up there mid 60's thru mid 70's...fond memories of Weld & Fairmount schools, Christ Church, Cleary square - the Pixie cinema, the Highway Spa....good times !!

Bill Seaward on March 31, 2005 09:49 PM.


What a great place it USED to be!!

Tom Hill on July 25, 2005 08:30 PM.


What a great place it USED to be!! Now!!! it's just an other Matterpan Sq.

Tom Hill on July 25, 2005 08:31 PM.


I lived in H.P. for several years as a kid..on Easton Avenue which is just off Dana (just down a set of stairs from Truman/Dana interesection..by MBTA tracks)..lived in 2 different houses on Easton one of which is no longer standing. I am stuck in Ohio for the moment..but whenever I am back in Boston I visit HP, cleary Square, Grew School, etc.

P.D. on June 12, 2006 07:57 AM.


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